Monday, 5 October 2009

Making your own rules

Well, almost as good as moving the goal posts - I thought I'd give people an insight in to the fault handling of our favourite telco.

Believe it or not they do give us a very tiny amount of compensation if they don't fix a fault in 40 hours. It is often not even money back for the time the fault lasted so not worth much, but we make a point of getting them to pay anyway.

However, the 40 hours is the time it is with them. And they run the clock! i.e. the time while they send back for re-test, even when they know it does not pass their own tests, does not count.

So, for example, we have a case were we reported a fault. It was definitely a fault there end as it affected a number of lines, and they were all fixed at once. We added a note that the fault had finally been fixed about 2 days later, so well over the 40 hours.

Some 46 days after reporting they finally close the fault. That is no comment, no update, no feedback for 46 days!

OK, so we did not chase anyway as it was actually fixed, but still, 46 days! What kind of a system allows a fault to just stay open for 46 days.

Anyway, they finally cleared it - claiming we cancelled the fault (not true) and saying the total clock time was 39 hours 36 minutes.

WTF!!!

The annoying thing is they don't even care. We won't get a sensible explanation or anything.

3 comments:

  1. Ha, found another just marked "cancelled" after 46 days and this one has a total time of 37:36:00

    ReplyDelete
  2. So will they manage to keep the problems with speeds/contention below 40 hrs?

    Or will they just tell us that there wasnt really a problem and we all imagined it?

    Arses!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Hi,

    Really enjoying the blog - in the context of modern service providers and how the events such as those described in your post come about, I think you'd enjoy the book 'Freedom From Command and Control' by John Seddon. I found it to be a fascinating read that explains a hell of a lot about what's wrong with serice design and management in so many organisations these days.

    ReplyDelete