Saturday, 5 February 2011

Quote of the day "Most cp's have plenty of ipv4 space left"

That was a supplier, when told we will not buy non IPv6 services and kit. I won't say who said this, but this is a sad state of affairs.

As I try to explain:- 

What makes you think this is about CPs having IPv4 space?

(a) ISPs (LIRs) forecast 6 months when requesting from RIPE, so they should not have more than 6 months left when RIPE run out. RIPE expect to run out in months, not years. By the end of the year we would expect CPs to be running out, or at the least seriously limiting how they issue IPv4.

(b) Right now there are endpoints on the Internet which our customers might want to access and are IPv6 only. It does not matter how many IPv4 addresses I have, if I do not provide IPv6 routing to my customer they cannot access all of the Internet.

The second point is relevant here - the Internet is not just IPv4. From now on we will see increasing numbers of cases where an endpoint is IPv6 only. It may be specific uses of services in specific networks initially, but eventually it will be proper public web sites and mail servers and the like. It only takes one endpoint to be IPv6-only and our customer needing to access it, and you have a problem, now!

P.S. Thanks to Simon on irc for finding an example http://video6.ustc.edu.cn/ 
Without IPv6 you cannot get to that and the apparent IPv4 version has no routing and anyway it links to pages like http://[2001:da8:d800::88]/tvplay/video@ustc.asx

3 comments:

  1. What format are those videos in? I've upgraded the mac with every codec known to man and it isn't having any of it..

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  2. I asked TalkTalk about IP6 and I got this response:


    Talk Talk have no immediate plans to offer IPv6, and as 90% of home
    routers sold in the UK do not support it, there is no pressing need. As
    for running out of addresses, Talk Talk have 'thought about it' and have
    enough IPv4 addresses for now and some time into the future. IPv6 is
    still about 2 years away from being implemented on a large scale, and it
    will likely be 5 - 10 years before IPv4 is 'switched off' and IPv6 is
    truly the 'standard' to connect.

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  3. It is nice to see an example of an IPv6-only website.

    But that website is a bit Chinese-looking and whilst technically I could use it as a stick to beat people with, it's not a nice potted example that I can easily explain to people.

    Perhaps AAISP could host some English-language IPv6-only pages?

    Something that I could plausibly claim was actual practical content that I ought to be able to look at, but currently couldn't.

    It doesn't need to be a large amount of content. It could be small.

    Perhaps a recipe for rice pudding.

    Technically, that would be practical meaningful content that I ought to be able to look at, but ultimately does not impact AAISP business if visitors can't access it.

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