Thursday, 7 February 2013

Snom m9 IPv6

The SNOM m9 VoIP phone just works using IPv6 with a FireBrick FB2500 VoIP call server.

I was expecting to have to tweak something or diagnose something one way or another, but no - we plugged it in - set the identity (server, username, password), and it works - incoming and outgoing calls - using IPv6.

We'll do a few more tests, but so far I have to say well done to SNOM!

The FireBrick handled the call and bridged the media between IPv6 and IPv4 with no problems.

We just need a simple cheap desk phone that does IPv6 now, please, snom...

17 comments:

  1. Does this device support multiple (IPv4/IPv6) sip accounts? Direct IPv6-IPv6 calling? I'm looking for something to replace an ageing Siemens Gigaset system.

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  2. If they launch one with hearing aid compatibility, I'll get one and see how it compares with my Aastra - or rather, I'll get David to test it for call use. I'll just be happy if it's simple to administrate.

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    1. It is worth noting that the VoIP/SIP base is standard DECT GAP compliant, so if you can find a hearing aid compatible DECT GAP handset you have the answer!

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  3. The problem with the m9 is it is either v4 OR v6 but not both at once. As I have Gradwell (v4 only) and AA VoIP registrations, for example, I can't try out the v6 functionality.

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    1. Oooh, we'll test that - it seemed to get an IPv4 and IPv6 address though... How does being one or other manifest itself?

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  4. Oh ok, well I haven't tried it, just going by the documentation; also it could be different on the m9r - I only have the m9.

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  5. That's strange, I must have been mistaken: everything I can find online says otherwise but I'm sure I can remember a screenshot with an explanation that you have to turn DHCP off to get IPv6!

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  6. Why do they still use DECT? Surely 802.11x would be a more useful connection method?

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  7. Why do they still use DECT? Surely 802.11x would be a more useful connection method?

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  8. Why do they still use DECT? Surely 802.11x would be a more useful connection method?

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    1. DECT is designed for this stuff, to be honest.

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    2. Having installed both DECT and 802.11x based handsets, I can say that DECT wins by a long, long way.

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    3. But DECT doesnt handle roaming over base stations at all well, that there 802.11x works much better

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    4. Err, DECT handles that perfectly - most DECT base stations happen not to handle it, but DECT as a protocol certainly does. What would be cool is if SNOM supported that, which they could easily do. I.e. they could discover other base stations on same LAN, handle the DECT and SIP level handover seamlessly. Sadly they don't do that.

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    5. Thats what i was meaning in that the SNOM doesnt do it, you could set it up with the snom m3 but it didnt work very well :(

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    6. What does DECT do that 802.11 doesn't that makes it more suitable for telephony? Rolling out DECT infrastructure as well as 802.11 seems a bit like having separate wiring for IP and phones (i.e. something that shouldn't be necessary for VoIP). Also, correct me if I'm wrong, but DECT can only handle numeric phone numbers?

      FWIW, I regularly use SIPDroid on my android phone to do VoIP over wifi (and 3G), which works reasonably well.

      Although I also have a UTStarcom 802.11g phone and that's buggy as hell (and unfortunately an example of a manufacturer walking away from their responsibilities - these phones were buggy and unstable when first released, drew lots of complaints on their support forums and they basically just ignored the complaints and dropped support for the device). But none of that seems to be something inherently wrong with wifi, just a problem with shoddy software.

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    7. "What does DECT do that 802.11 doesn't that makes it more suitable for telephony? "

      It's much more efficient with battery use. 802.11 phones seem to eat through battery as though they were on mains.

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