Wednesday, 6 December 2017

IPv6 World Leader 2017

I was at the IPv6 UK Council annual meeting yesterday, and (A&A) received an award from the IPv6 forum. The Jim Bound award. Thank you.


It was an interesting day, and quite long, but at the end of the day lots of people bought me pints of cider in the Paternoster pub, thank you.

IPv6 is not new, and it was interesting to hear how different companies have deployed IPv6 and are deploying it. The talk from Facebook was really interesting - IPv6 everywhere internally with just edge devices talking legacy IPv4 for those who are not up to date. They also report that IPv6 access has better performance.

One key point is that IPv4 is somewhat decaying, with more and more problems, especially with things like Carrier Grade NAT. IPv6 rescues you from that and keeps the Internet working.

11 comments:

  1. What was the award for? For your overall contribution to IPv6 matters or for something specific?

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    1. General, and having such a high proportion of traffic on IPv6.

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  2. I really wish the manufacturers of commercial grade devices would get their act together, both my telly (Samsung) and my VOIP phone adapter (Cisco) do IPv4 only. What's frustrating about this is that I'm reasonably sure they both use Linux.

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    1. Well it isn't a like for like replacement, devices can't simply enable it and let end users choose. It could be wrapped up that they could but there is no motivation for manufacturers to do the extra work at present.

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    2. IPv6 is not new! Both the devices I mentioned were designed long after IPv6 was introduced. There's no excuse for not running a dual stack device especially if your product is based on Linux.

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    3. Too true. I'm mostly IPv6 except for the TV stuff & the Voda femtocell. However my router is homebrew Linux on a apu2c2. I was in Hawaii earlier this year and the Arris cable box gave me V6 from the local cable co. That was a bit of a surprise.

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    4. And sometimes we go backwards. My workplace just replaced one Cisco VPN endpoint with another, newer one. The old one works on IPv6. The new one isn't listening on it. This is *intentional*. (Apparently too many people had broken IPv6 paths to their ISPs and it was leading to long signin delays, so they've chosen to turn it off entirely so that, uh, *everyone* has a long signin delay.)

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    5. Meanwhile, if I choose the wrong VPN endpoint for work, I have no IPv4 access at all - the endpoint is dual stack, but it only gives me IPv6.

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  3. How about a blog post on what ip6 means to the average user? (OK - perhaps "more techie than average but not a networking expert"!) Why it matters and how to use it??

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    1. Wel, to the average user, it should mean nothing, just that the Internet (keeps) working properly.

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