2019-03-01

Over kill?

A friend of mind dropped dead of a heart attach recently, and he was a year younger than me. He was at home, but so easily could have been at work.

It makes you think.

Well, more, it makes you shit scared!

As usual one's assessment of risk is skewed by the most recent experience.

Even so, I do think that the potential life saving benefit of a defibrillator way out weights the cost. More to the point, I can afford the cost. I can't afford to drop dead (IMHO).

We took advice from Red Cross, and we now have one at the office, and I have one at home too. I am surprised more offices do not have one. Our first aiders at work are trained on it as well (thanks to Red Cross), but it is pretty idiot proof.

I hope we never have to use it, either of them.

P.S. From the comments, one thing is getting one that can go outside, and so be accessible to others (e.g. others in my road) if needed. The ones we have are not for outside installation, sorry, but certainly something to consider if you are getting one installed.

16 comments:

  1. We've got one of these in each wing of our office and trained first aiders. Never really considered one for home (Unless someone has already had an attack) - about a grand a pop?

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  2. Good work, best investment ever IMHO. We have one at work and one of my staff is a CFR and carries one around in his car.

    There should be more of these around.

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  3. We have one in our office estate but in the 1st building only. It would take me about 5 minutes to go over there, get it and come back. Not ideal but still better than not having one.

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    1. We have two offices which are adjacent so no problem only having one in the middle, thankfully. As I say, I hope we never use it.

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  4. Stick them outside and list them on GoodSAM so that the ambulance service can point people to them..... (please!)

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    1. I see your point, but I don't think this is one designed to be outside, sorry. Something to consider when buying one though.

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    2. The AED will be designed to live outside, the cabinet you have probably isn’t as I suspect you will want to lock it (many cabinets have combinations which you can share with the ambulance service). You could at least add the office ones as available during working hours (that’s an option too).

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    3. The AED would be fine in a suitable enclosure like this one ->

      https://www.defibshop.co.uk/accessories/outdoor-cabinets/aed-armor-mild-steel-locked-cabinet-with-heating

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  5. Cockburn (pronounced "Coburn") 𓂺Friday, 1 March 2019 at 18:59:00 GMT

    Serious question - how do you actually know if you're having a heart attack?

    I've seen all those adverts on TV about feeling a squeeze around your chest, but I often get those feelings and usually just put it down to being a bit of indigestion. I really wouldn't know the difference between a heart attack vs just a bit of trapped wind or a bit of acid reflux. Is it the sort of thing that, if you're having one, it's completely unmistakable? Or can it be more subtle than that in which case are there some clear signs to look out for?

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    1. I can't answer your question, but worth noting that these AEDs are smart enough to analyse the patient's heart rhythm and know:
      (a) whether the patient is having a heart attack; and
      (b) whether the patient's heart rhythm can be helped by shocking.
      I'm a trained first aider, so I know how to use them, but they really are very idiot proof and anyone should be able to figure it out without training so long as they have the confidence to try - follow the pictorial instructions for where to stick the pads, turn it on and then do what it tells you to do.

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    2. Time to be a pedant and point out that AEDs are designed for cardiac arrest (an electrical problem) rather than heart attack (a circulatory problem) - although one can ultimately lead to the other! It can do nothing to help you (apart from recording some basic ECG data I suppose) if your heart isn’t in one of the “shockable” arrhythmia rhythms (VF/pVT).

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    3. When you're having a heart attack, from people I've spoken to, you KNOW.

      A "sense of impending doom" is one of the symptoms they teach you on first aid courses 😂

      But if anyone is having actual chest pains, it's better to be safe than sorry. Stick an AED on them and if they're fine, it'll soon tell you

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    4. Just to be really clear, an AED can't tell you someone is fine, only that they don't have a shockable rhythm - they could still be having a heart attack or in cardiac arrest.

      If the patient is unconscious yes use an AED if you have one but CPR is also extremely important...

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  6. We had four of these on each floor in a past workplace (huge Canary Wharf tower block). Alas, the only person to drop dead of a heart attack while I was there did so while on the loo (fairly common due to the blood pressure spikes you get then), so a) nobody could see him because the loo door was locked b) nobody even knew anything was wrong until it was hours too late. :(

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  7. Make sure that it is on the map, so it can be found. https://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/Tag:emergency%3Ddefibrillator

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