2019-11-30

More fun with GPS...

The NMEA sentences from a GPS work on degrees, minutes and fractions. As a format they are horrid - the sign is a separate character N/S, E/W, and the value is fixed length so DDMM.mmmm and DDDMM.mmmm format.

The 4 places for minutes is not that precise, but more than enough for absolute GPS positioning.

But there is an alternative, and it is like the IPv6 of GPS. More precision that you could ever want - ECEF format is X/Y/Z in metres from centre of the Earth to the micrometer!!!

$ECEFPOSVEL,124015.000,3985352.629186,-54462.755461,4962832.255023,-0.008022,0.003776,0.022063

Amazing. So whilst not adding absolute accuracy, it does add some impressive relative precision.


Walking in the road to spell my name, LOL.

2019-11-28

Shit week (or two)

Some times things go wrong, it happens, but if I did not know better I would say some deity was out to get me the last couple of weeks!

  • My 3D printer started playing up, but in a subtle way. It was printing some parts slightly too narrow, which is crazy. I spent ages on this as the lid of a case did not fit on the base properly. They are a tight fit, but this was just too tight and meant it cracked the edge of the lid. I adjusted tolerances in the design, printed loads of tests, and finally the lid fitted the base just, but no idea why.
  • I then put the lid on the widget I was making which has an OLED display. This is glass, and has a very thin bit at the edge. Well, the lid is carefully designed to leave a small amount of space around this, but it printed wrong didn't it! So fitting it cracked the display.
  • So I had to remove the display from the base board, and it is fitted with square pins which are a bugger to desolder, so I cut them. But the cutting caused the pins to tilt enough to rip the tracks off the main board. So I had to make a new main board.
  • The 3D printing got worse, now it was clearly squashing the design at a particular point, but only some of the time!
  • It turns out it would print sensibly to start and then get worse, but also a small print would be fine (it broke as specific points on the X axis) all of which caused confusion as I would think I had found the cause (e.g. the X axis rails were slightly skewed) because a small test print (after tinkering) would seem to have fixed it.
  • I tried all sorts, and eventually ordered a new stepper motor. The one from Amazon was wrong current, so did not work, but I found that the original stepper motor was actually slipping on the flat edge of the spindle, only at certain points and only when it warmed up. All this, wasting nearly a whole week, because of a loose grub screw. Oddly Lulzbot totally failed to answer support emails (apart from a e-ticket number) which is really bad of them.

  • So, re-installed original stepper motor, tightened, applied thread lock, and bingo, working perfectly again, phew. Back in business.
  • I then tried to mill a new board on my milling machine. I have done a lot of these, and I am using a simple bed-levelling program I wrote to measure the corners and adjust the cut over the board to allow fine tracks to be reliably printed. But this one new board (which was bigger than previous ones, and has some long straight cuts) was not cutting correctly - turns out I had a bug in my code that got the Z level wrong (was for previous point not current point) causing some tracks to cut at wrong depth. Just enough to not show up most of the time, but create duff boards several times.
  • So I was improving the code, and making it probe several times for each point and more slowly, and so on....
  • And just then the main milling motor on my milling machine stopped working. It would spin up slowly and then grind to a halt.
  • I tried on a bench supply and it is fine, so clearly the power supply not the motor.
  • I ordered a 48V 3A power supply, and that was not beefy enough to run it.
  • I ordered a nice 10A bench supply, which I am waiting for now - will it work - I'll add a PS to this post later today :-)
  • In the mean time, with 3D printing working, I had managed to make one working PCB, so made a case for the latest widget and it did not fit. For some reason I had made a silly mistake in measuring the parts, which took my about 6 attempts (at over an hour per print) to get right - this is crazy.
  • However, the slightly wrong print (due to design, not printer, this time) meant the button cell battery holder moved, pulling tracks off the board, shorting it, and that took me ages to debug as the GPS refused to work with no backup battery.
  • I set up the Quectel M95 mobile module, and surprise surprise all of the commands I need are different to the SIM800 module I was using. Arrrg! Thankfully they have a good manual. So new GPS tracker working well.
  • Then something else stopped working on the board - I don't know what yet - I need to use my magnifying glasses to work on this board, and guess what, they just snapped.
  • And in the middle of this, other issues, involving someone having unexpected hospital visits (which have turned out fine, phew).
It has been a shitty couple of weeks really.
It can only get better :-)

P.S. And not the plastic cover thing on end of my glasses has come off so I stabbed myself putting them on.

P.P.S. the cheapest, unbranded, iffy looking DC power supply I have seen, from Amazon... Actually has a CE mark, but not sure I'll ever leave it unattended. But it works - yay!

2019-11-11

Hayes AT

A long long time ago, in galaxy far far away (no, scratch that bit), a standard evolved for talking to modems, well, specifically Hayes modems, but it was widely adopted.

It works over a serial link by sending commands starting AT for (attention). Now, I am pretty sure they were reasonably consistent, back in the day, but like many things this standard has evolved and been bastardised.

We now have things like this SIM800 module, which is basically a mobile phone in a can, with no display or keypad. It talks on a serial bus and talks Hayes AT commands, but as modified by various GSM bodies.

Now, some AT commands are consistent. You send AT and some options, and get some data followed by OK. Good.

There is a reasonably consistent format for commands and settings and queries, mostly. There are then AT+ functions which are used for a lot of the mobile stuff.

But it is far from consistent. The AT+CIPSEND, after the > sends "SEND OK" not "SENT OK" or "OK", and AT+CIPSHUT sends "SHUT OK". Why are these not just "OK" like the rest? I am also pretty sure I had one case of a response with no OK (but cannot find it now).

Then we have the asynchronous messages from the device. Most start with a +, like "+CREG: 0,1", so can be recognised if you are expecting another response. But some are just text like "SMS Ready". These smack of debug messages left in the code.

Half the interface was clearly designed for a person sat at a terminal typing stuff, and the other half was designed for talking to a machine!

But when you get to some of the higher level functions, like establishing a UDP "connection", it gets even more special. For a start, you look for "CONNECT OK" not simply "OK", and mostly at that point it seems to avoid sending asynchronous messages (though I cannot be sure). Some still can be sent, like "+PDP: DEACT" when it loses the connection. What you do get though, with no prompt, header, or indication of length is the raw binary content of any UDP packets you receive on the connection. So send a packet containing "+PDP: DEACT" and I'll think the connection has dropped!

What would have been sensible would have been a line something like "+DATA=N" and then N bytes of data, or some such, but no, it is simply the raw UDP packet.

Then we have some interesting little bugs and discrepancies. One that took a while to work but was that the length of UDP data I can send is limited. Not to 65535 which is what IP limits to, but to 1472 which is the available UDP in a 1500 byte IPv4 packet. Except it is not. It is actually 1460, any more says "ERROR". Oh, and it won't allow me to send a zero length UDP packet - no idea why, and as NAT is often used this is something I may want to send as a keep alive. I ended up having to send one byte.

But there is an even more special feature. When you receive a UDP packet, as I say, it arrives as the raw binary data via serial. I am relieved to see no mangling of any bytes, which is good. Except it truncates the last byte of the message. Yep, I have to send an extra dummy byte on my packets to the device. WTF?

I could save myself from a lot of this by coding PPP, pretending to dial on an old style modem and talking PPP which the device fakes and converts to packet data. This is a serious consideration, to be honest.

However, after a lot of messing about, my GPS trackers are sending (and receiving, when needed) tracking data over UDP over mobile - yay!

P.S. I may have maligned the SIM800 as incoming UDP looks like it may be my bug losing a byte, and there is an option for a header with length for incoming UDP. But the Quectel M95 does look a bit nicer.