Thursday, 12 December 2013

Odd Christmas present

Well, I did wonder if this was the Christmas present to send to our router suppliers. For some reason they include a not-quite-cat5 cable in the box that has only 2 pairs, so will only work on 10/100Mb/s Ethernet.

These cables are such a pain in the arse that we remove them and replace them with a proper cat5 patch lead before sending the router out. Yes, the router will not do more than 100Mb/s, but the cables end up on other kit if you are not careful and cause much cursing and annoyance which we would not want to impose on any of our customers.

But what to do with a box of useless cables? One plan was to send to the router suppliers. That may be seen as a tad rude. In actual fact it is a "guess the number of cables" competition in the office, before they go for recycling. I think only staff can join in though, sorry :-)

11 comments:

  1. Wouldn't it be more environmentally friendly (and cheaper) to send the original cables out, but with a heavy duty (plastic?) sticker on each one warning that the cable is not gigabit compatible?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It would be more environmentally friendly if they did not make shit cables in the first place!

      Delete
    2. Absolutely agree. There's nothing you can do about that though.

      Delete
    3. We've had at least one person try to insist that our device is at fault because a cable with heavy duty labelling saying "FOR VOICE USE ONLY - NOT SUITABLE FOR COMPUTER DATA" wasn't working well as an Ethernet cable for computer data. Apparently, that label is not clear enough - they thought it meant that the cable was the wrong colour for data use, but should still work. I suspect such a person would do the same with a 2 pair cable, regardless of warning label.

      Delete
    4. In this case, the question that should be asked is whether such a person deserves their daily ration of oxygen.

      On the other hand, perhaps the label should have said "For voice use only. Will not work for computer data."

      Delete
  2. Send it to me! If just for the dragons :)

    ReplyDelete
  3. It's a shame that even as business customers you can't persuade them to up their game a bit in this respect. How much extra would it cost for them to supply proper 4-pair cat5e leads instead - pennies, surely, not to mention a net saving to you?! (Failing that, you'd think they could at least not supply the duff leads to you.)

    Then again, I was a little surprised to find an ADSL filter in the router box for my new FTTC service ... fortunately, my grandfather was missing a filter on one extension in his house, so next visit the surplus A&A filter was put to good use after all.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Did we send a filter with an FTTC install? If so, I'll need to chat to the sales guys.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes - just one, sealed in the box with the router. Surprising, but actually useful in my case, so thank you for that!

      Delete
  5. Why not re-terminate them with RJ11 connectors and use them as higher quality last-2meter cables? Sending a box of severed RJ45's back to the router manufacturer would also send a stronger message/save on postage :)

    ReplyDelete
  6. Doesn't the supplier have a duty under WEEE to collect them?

    ReplyDelete