Saturday, 1 June 2013

What is "smart dual band"

Does anyone know what "smart dual band" is exactly?

BT say that *ONLY* the BT Home Hub uses it?

Is that true? If it is simply a matter of a dual band WiFi (e.g. 2.5GHz and 5GHz) then there are loads of wireless access points that do that.

But it would help to know what "smart dial band" actually is first.


8 comments:

  1. I would expect it is auto channel selection and their "only the home hub" claim is a lie - or maybe none does auto channel selection on both bands at once?

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  2. According to http://www.productsandservices.bt.com/products/broadband/wireless-hub-router#/intro it seems to be dual band with some extra bumph about reducing interference etc. Marketing tripe, it seems.

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  3. I think it's just a marketing term for automatic channel selection, presuamably it scans for other wi-fi networks and possibly also does a spectrum scan for non wi-fi interference and then trys to select the best channel.

    It will be interesting to see what happens if a load of routers that support these features if we'd see them constantly channel hopping to try and avoid each other.

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  4. Perhaps it is "Smart Dual band is a registered trademark of BT Plc and relates to the placement of our logo on the product" or similar BT-specific nonsense. Or perhaps it relates to the fact it can offer your internet connection for us by all and sundry by making you a member of BT OpenWorld (or whatever it called this week) without your knowledge.

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  5. Also it depends how you read it.

    It can be read as "The old BT Home hubs did not have (insert marketing term here)"

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  6. I read it in the same vein as 'Inifinity, only from BT'. It's a complete non-statement. Maybe 'Home::1, only from A&A' might have legs..


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  7. Could be referring to a common enterprise-class feature that pushes clients onto 5GHz if they support it. There's no standard so different vendors do this in different ways. The most common way is just to ignore probe requests on 2.4 until the client gives up and tries 5 instead. Bit clumsy really.

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  8. I only need to look as far back as AA's/your rants about "advanced notification" of an outage that began 90 minutes earlier: my first assumption for pretty much everything BT/OpenReach says is "this is bollocks".

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